Architectural Review Emerging Architecture awards

Arena Berlin Nov 15th - 17th 2017

JOINT WINNER - Bunker 599 by RAAAF & Atelier de Lyon

JOINT WINNER - Bunker 599 by RAAAF & Atelier de Lyon

In a radical way this intervention sheds new light on the Dutch policy on cultural heritage. At the same, it makes people look at their surroundings in a new way. The project lays bare two secrets of the New Dutch Waterline (NDW), a military line of defence in use from 1815 until 1940 protecting the cities of Muiden, Utrecht, Vreeswijk and Gorinchem by means of intentional flooding. 

A seemingly indestructible bunker with monumental status is sliced open. The design thereby opens up the minuscule interior of one of NDW’s 700 bunkers, the insides of which are normally cut off from view completely. In addition, a long wooden boardwalk cuts through the extremely heavy construction. It leads visitors to a flooded area and to the footpaths of the adjacent natural reserve. The pier and the piles supporting it remind them that the water surrounding them is not caused by e.g. the removal of sand but rather is a shallow water plain characteristic of the inundations in times of war.

The sliced up bunker forms a publicly accessible attraction for visitors of the NDW. It is moreover visible from the A2 highway and can thus also be seen by tens of thousands of passers-by each day. The project is part of the overall strategy of RAAAF | Atelier de Lyon to make this unique part of Dutch history accessible and tangible for a wide variety of visitors. Paradoxically, after the intervention Bunker 599 became a Dutch national monument.

Client: Municipality Culemborg | DLG (The Dutch Service for Land and Water Management)
Design: RAAAF | Atelier de Lyon
Movie: Roberto Rizzo
Location: Diefdijk 5 - Highway A2
Status: completion 2010
Awards: Dutch Design Award 2011, Architectural Review Award 2013 
Video: Roberto Rizzo

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JOINT WINNER Pitch Black by Hernan Diaz Alonso

JOINT WINNER Pitch Black by Hernan Diaz Alonso

Fear and Lust hide in the dark, the solo show attempts to create a pure emotional reaction to scales architecture, submerging the audience in vast territory of reflections and objects that pretend to be in dynamic mutation.
This project is best described as a gallery exhibition displaying a range of projects that vary in scale. The exhibition consists of five major elements.
Element 1- An array of “spiders” that occupy the floor space of the gallery. A modular spider with two additional modular inserts area used to display varying sizes of 3D prints.
Element 2 – Portable DVD players are placed in a select number of spiders toward the entrance of the space. These run animations of projects that are on display in the gallery.
Element 3 – A series of 3D print are displayed on modular inserts that are held in place by the spiders.
Element 4 – Plasma screens are placed in each bay along the fenestrated wall. These screens run a series of slow-playing, looped, high-resolution renders of select projects.
Element 5 – The long continuous wall displays backlit line drawings. White lines cover the entire black wall.

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JOINT WINNER Lullaby Factory by Studio Weave

JOINT WINNER Lullaby Factory by Studio Weave

Studio Weave has transformed an awkward exterior space landlocked by buildings into the Lullaby Factory – a secret world that cannot be seen except from inside the hospital and cannot be heard by the naked ear, only by tuning in to its radio frequency or from a few special listening pipes.

The multi-phased redevelopment of Great Ormond Street Hospital, in London’s Bloomsbury area, means that the recently completed Morgan Stanley Clinical Building and the 1930s Southwood Building currently sit very close together. The latter is due to be demolished in 15 years, but in the intervening period large windows in the west elevation of the MSCB look directly onto a pipe-ridden brickwork facade, with the gap between the two less than one metre in places.

In our competition entry we proposed that the Southwood Building, with its oodles of mysterious pipes and plant is not really the Southwood Building, but the Lullaby Factory, manufacturing and releasing gentle, beautiful lullabies to create a calming and uplifting environment for the young patients to recover in.

Our aim for this project was to re-imagine the Southwood façade as the best version of itself, accepting and celebrating its qualities and oddities; and rather than hiding what is difficult, creating something unique and site specific.

We have designed a fantasy landscape reaching ten storeys in height and 32 metres in length, which can engage the imagination of everyone, from patients and parents to hospital staff, by providing an interesting and curious world to peer out onto. Aesthetically the Lullaby Factory is a mix of an exciting and romantic vision of industry, and the highly crafted beauty and complexity of musical instruments.

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